23 Jun 2017

Expert Explains Why Cassava Farmers Are Poor

A pro at the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture, Mr. Kenton Dashiell, says low plant yield and poor agronomy practice is accountable for the poor status of most cassava agriculturists in Nigeria,Punch reports.

Dashiell, who is the Deputy Director-General, Partnership for Delivery at the foundation, communicated this in the midst of a thoughtfulness visit to the head office of Punch Nigeria Limited in Magboro, Ogun State.

According to him, while the typical cassava yield is 25 tons for every hectare Nigerian agriculturists are getting in the region of five and 10 tons for each hectare.

To fulfill extraordinary yield, along these lines, the ace incited the country's farmers to get the right combination of cassava stem, observe right scattering in planting, finish incredible weed control, and apply excrement at the ideal time.

“The challenge for cassava processors is getting raw materials. They have good business plans and good market for the finished products.

“Cassava should get 25 tonnes yields per hectare but on the average, farmers get 10. Some farmers are getting five tonnes per hectare.

“With 10 tonnes per hectare, it is guaranteed that the farmers would be in poverty. With 20 tonnes you will start to have some reasonable income. With 25 tonnes you are in good business.”

On the achievement recorded by the IITA in developing cassava and different harvests in the nation, Dashiell noted cassava had been attacked by bugs in the 80s until the point when scientists from the organization followed the issue to Brazil where cassava begun from to discover a cure.

He additionally related that plant cultivators in the establishment had discovered answer for maize infection that kept the harvest from developing in the northern piece of the nation.

The foundation, he stated, created maize assortments that were impervious to the infection and the product began thriving extremely well in the North.

"Northerners now incline toward maize to sorghum and millet," he said.

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